Site no longer supporterd

This site is no longer supported and will not be updated with new content. You are welcome to browse and download all content already included in the site. Please note you will have to register your email address to access the site. We expect to close the site down by December 2016.

You are here

Effectiveness of public health initiatives on treatment systems

Professor Ian Gilmore, Royal Liverpool University Hospital and University of Liverpool, UK, and Professor Jürgen Rehm, University of Toronto, Canada, and Technical University Dresden, Germany

  • Burden prevention by increasing treatment rates

    PART 3 of presentation Effectiveness of public health initiatives on treatment systems

    A lot of the alcohol-related damage and deaths can be attributed to those who drink the most, the people with alcohol use disorders. To decrease mortality and increase life expectancy, interventions, brief interventions and treatment are effective measures. The overall message from this symposium presentation is that prevention, public health efforts, should be complementary to interventions, not in competition.

  • Burden in terms of cost to society – increased prevention policies

    PART 2 of presentation Effectiveness of public health initiatives on treatment systems

    Two to three percent of the gross domestic product of a developed country is lost because of alcohol, mainly through productivity: absenteeism, the healthcare costs, the crime and social disorder costs. National policies are changing, as the UK example shows where alcohol has now moved up the agenda as public health priority. Prevention campaigns, price policies and taxation can be instrumental in prevention.

  • Burden in terms of stigmatization

    PART 1 of presentation Effectiveness of public health initiatives on treatment systems

    About 30 years ago depression was about as highly stigmatised as alcohol dependence.  Right now, depression is way more normalized. However, as shown from several surveys – including the one conducted among the symposium participants – the stigmatisation of alcohol dependence is found to be still very high, with consequences at a personal and professional level.

Featured presentations

Share

Notify your friends and contacts about this Progress in Mind Resource Centre, with free access to excellent content.

 

 

 

Suggestions

Please tell us what you like us to cover on the Resource Centre – we welcome your suggestions and comments

Search this site

Search form